Lead Found in Drinking Water in Schools

Eight Hamilton schools and daycares were found to have too much lead in their drinking water through testing of individual taps in 2016. Eric Mathews, the city’s director of safe water, stated that it’s definitely a concern that has to be dealt with. Mathews said he’s thankful for provincial guidelines that need schools and child-care centers to flush pipes daily or weekly – based on the time of buildings – and test for lead concentrations in drinking water. Kids are a vulnerable population to lead exposure.

St. Kateri Tekakwitha Catholic Elementary School had lead levels in drinking water over five times greater than the provincial standard of 10 parts per billion, showed evaluation results from the Ontario Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change acquired by the Toronto Star. The east Mountain school failed three drinking water tests of individual taps during an appliance repair service and air conditioning installation in July, 2016 – among them after the system was flushed.

Pat Daly, seat of the Hamilton-Wentworth Catholic District School Board, is confident the 2017 results will show marked improvement. In St. Kateri, they shifted significant sections of pipes, piping and joints to the satisfaction of the public health department. As required, they are being flushed on a cycle every day and will stay so for a couple of decades.

In total, two from Hamilton’s 56 Catholic colleges failed lead tests. The other was St. Martin of Tours Catholic Elementary School in Stoney Creek, which had a standing water test above the provincial standard in July. Two from Hamilton’s 108 public colleges also were found to have too much lead in their drinking water.

École Élémentaire Michaëlle Jean in Binbrook had lead levels over double the brink while Queensdale Elementary School on the central Mountain failed a test after the machine was flushed. Reputation samples are more likely to reveal lead since they’re taken while the plumbing has not been used for at least six hours. A flushed sample is after the water has run for at least five minutes and then left unused for approximately 30 minutes.

Clearly we take the health and security of our students very seriously. Stacey Zucker, associate director of support services in the Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board, said that they make sure they follow up and follow the regulations. She says the issue was dealt with at both colleges.

One Hamilton daycare is using bottled water while the emergency plumber handles the piping and hot water service repairs in one of its locations after status- and flushed-water tests demonstrated excessive lead levels. Today’s Family Early Learning and Child Care is having a filter in its Delta Adventure Camp website to wash fruit and toys. Kids do not drink the tap water in the camp, which is situated at Delta United Church in 47 Ottawa St. S.

CEO Marni Flaherty commented that they were completely on top of it. According to Flaherty, come up with recommendations and they will follow them. Over the last two decades, over 640 schools and daycares provincewide were found to have too much lead in their drinking water for both heating and cooling through yearly tests demanded by the 2007 provincial laws.

This is an important concern because lead is a toxic metal that especially affects fetuses and young children. Even low levels of exposure could lead to problems with intellectual development. The amount of failed tests is only expected to get worse as new rules about how samples are collected started coming into force in July.

Facility executives should always make sure that the elements in their buildings’ plumbing systems meet the local plumbing code requirements. However, with the increased concern over lead in drinking water, it may be helpful to know the sources of lead contamination and the particular demands of the various laws, regulations, and criteria associated with plumbing and lead systems.

Lead is a hazardous contaminant commonly found in plumbing systems of older houses and buildings with blocked plumbing and drains or a burst pipe. Occasionally newer buildings may also have a lead issue. There are 3 main resources:

  • Lead service lines linking the building plumbing systems into the public water supply system, which most often occur in buildings constructed before 1950
  • Lead solder used in aluminum piping systems, which mainly occurred before 1986
  • Lead-containing brass or galvanized pipes and fittings that are not certified to the NSF/ANSI 61: Drinking Water System Components-Health Effects standard

Additionally, products that don’t comply with the “lead-free” content demands of the U.S. Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA), effective January 1, 2014, could also serve as a source of lead.

3-D Monitoring to Eliminate Patient Falls

While you may think patient falls are inevitable at a hospital, health system Mission Health says it could have the ability to get rid of the problem through the use of virtual 3-D monitoring technologies. It’s so bullish about the technology that it intends to incorporate the machine in every area of its new 220-bed Hospital for Advanced Medicine by the time it opens in Spring 2019.

Falls are a complex problem with multiple causes and risk factors. Fall prevention in hospital isn’t easy, however there are lots of things we can do to help lower the risk. Some hospitals may routinely use some or all of strategies to prevent falls. Please note that not all plans are demonstrated to work for all patients in all settings. Doctors ought to choose strategies in consultation with their care teams, considering all clinical and organisational elements.

To prevent falls that cause injuries, hospitals often encourage patients that have not undergone surgery to stay in bed. However, some medical experts say that may be a large mistake. Numerous studies have proven that immobility increases the chances of muscle atrophy, blood clots, bed scores and delirium. For elderly or very sick patients, the threat is much greater: being trapped for a couple of days may cause a permanent functional decline, making it harder for patients to return home. Nevertheless as evaluation of preventable medical errors increased in recent years, many hospitals set a greater priority on preventing drops than boosting mobility.

The system ran a 90-day pilot in 2015 in its neuroscience unit with the new technology and the advice of IT consultants specialised in healthcare, which is intended to prevent falls. During this period, there were zero unassisted drops with patients tracked by the monitoring technology compared with 10 unassisted falls together with the normal treatment patient group.

The tech, Patient Observer from Cerner, utilizes core camera technologies with a Microsoft Kinect detector and Microsoft Surface Pro 4 tablet system which offers 3-D skeletal visualization and thickness sensing within 20 feet. The software enables a monitor technician to define and draw virtual zones, trip wires and other trigger points around a patient in a field of view.

The camera always monitors human motion and generates an alert when the system detects movement in or around the defined virtual zone. Marc Westle, DO, senior vice president of innovation in Mission Health, states that visual and audible alarms are sent to the monitor technician through a live, high-definition streaming video feed across advanced network services and security and cloud computing.

The technology includes bi-directional sound, which allows the monitor technician to socialize with or listen to a patient room. Mission has shown real value with Patient Observer deployed for Falls-risk patients, yet they think that Patient Observer is a technology platform, which will deliver value on additional use cases throughout the health system.

When it came to the pilot, a group of registered nurses in the neuroscience unit used the Morse Falls Scale standards together with their clinical experience to develop an algorithm to identify patients with the maximum risk for a drop in the unit. This identical group developed a clinical consultancy to deploy the Patient Observer technology, depending on the patient evaluation.

Certified nursing assistants were trained in the technology, then were assigned as track technicians for all patients put on Patient Observer. Westle stated that Monitor techs could communicate with the individual to divert risky behavior or handle the individual’s immediate needs. Bedside care team members could be contacted for any essential problems that couldn’t be handled by the monitor techs. The analysis demonstrated that redirection of the individual was highly successful in reducing the possibility of a fall. These extraordinary results were achieved through participation of clinical resources and integration of technologies to nurse-driven clinical workflows.

Patient Observer is meant to be used as an addition to rather than replacement of a multi-component fall prevention training program. At Mission Health, there’s a comprehensive fall prevention program in place and adhered to by maintenance teams. Standard fall-prevention interventions include: bed locked in low position with rails up, call bell, call light, assistive devices, on-slip patient footwear, dry floor and sufficient lighting, clutter-free space, personal items inside the patient’s reach, proper use of sensory aids, hourly clinician rounds, and patient and family education.

To tailor interventions to each patient, Mission Health also uses the patient’s individual fall risk such as yellow identification armbands or gowns, bed and chair alarms, and alert signage outside the individual’s room. Mission Health is actively engaged in a job expansion that will deploy a total of 84 wireless cameras throughout the health system. To achieve this aim, an off-site central monitoring unit was constructed and is expected to be ready for occupancy in late October. A team of over 12 technicians per change will occupy the central monitoring unit and be cross-trained to give coverage on Patient Observer or telemetry monitoring.

Health Benefits of Alcohol for Studying

As a college student, you hear plenty of mixed messages. Partying is fun, but studying is essential. You have a final tomorrow morning, but your hot neighbor is hosting a beer pong tournament. Whether you like a refined glass of red from a vineyard in the Yarra Valley Australia or are happy to chug the cheapest box wine you can find, we all know there’s several negative connotations around drinking. But, fear not,  there may actually be some positives! Alcohol consumption may prime particular brain regions to learn and remember better, a new study from the Waggoner Center for Alcohol and Addiction Research at The University of Texas at Austin finds.

wine yarra valley, alcohol, learning, find a tutorThe common view that drinking Is bad for memory and learning is not wrong according to neurobiologist Hitoshi Morikawa, but it highlights just one side of what ethanol ingestion does to the mind.

Typically, conversations surrounding memory and learning are focused on conscious memory, but Moriwaka’s results published last month in The Journal of Neuroscience found that while the capacity of short-term memory like an acquaintances name or the a definition of a phrase is diminished, alcohol may enhance subconscious ability to learn.

Morikawa’s study, discovered that multiple exposures to ethanol enhances the plasticity of synapses in a crucial area in the mind. It is supportive of current literature in neuroscience that purports an emerging consensus  that alcohol and drug addiction is basically a learning and memory disorder.

When we consume alcohol (or inject heroin, or take coke, or drop methamphetamines), our subconscious is changing, learning how to increase consumption. However, it does not stop there. We become more receptive to forming subsconscious memories and customs concerning music, food, even people and social conditions.

In a significant sense, Morikawa proposes that alcoholics are not hooked on the experience of relief or pleasure they get from drinking alcohol; they’re hooked on the constellation of behavioral, environmental and physiological cues which are reinforced when alcohol triggers the release of dopamine in the brain.

“People commonly think of dopamine as a happy transmitter, or a pleasure transmitter, but more accurately it’s a learning transmitter,” says Morikawa. “It strengthens those synapses that are active when dopamine is released.”

Alcohol, in this version, is the enabler. It hijacks the dopaminergic system, and it tells our mind that what we are doing at the moment is rewarding (and thus worth repeating).

One of the things we learn is that drinking alcohol is rewarding. We also learn that going into the pub, chatting with friends, eating certain foods and listening to certain sorts of songs are rewarding. The more frequently we do these things while drinking (and the dopamine which gets released) the more “potentiated” the several synapses become and the more we crave the set of associations and experiences that orbit around the alcohol usage.

Morikawa’s long-term hope is that by understanding the neurobiological underpinnings of addiction better, he can create anti-addiction drugs which would weaken, rather than strengthen, the important synapses. And if he can do that, he would have the ability to erase the subconscious memory of dependence.

Essentially, he is trying to de-wire these learned associations, but this comes with a risk as these drugs could be misused as a brain controlling substance, but with the right guidance these drugs would remove the controlling elements of addictive drugs

hangover, english tutor, wineries yarra valleyHowever, we do not have to tell you there is no worse feeling than rolling into course really hungover with your mind totally fried and your stomach in a dangerously fragile state. And to be perfectly honest, hangovers kind of make you dumber.

A 2013 study conducted from Keele University found hangovers impair the ability to think clearly and do simple arithmetic. The analysis also found hangovers slow response time; a hungover individual in their 20s has the identical response time as someone in their 40s.

But given both sides of the research we tend to favour the positive factors!

We’re here to give you a bit of great information about alcohol as the academic year begins: When consumed in moderation, alcohol can actually improve your academic performance, so it might be time to find a tutor who is willing to shout a few rounds.

Here’s why you should not hate yourself for ducking by Happy Hour prior to a study session at the library.

1. Alcohol can enhance your creativity.

A hangover may leave you unable to consider a lot of anything, but a drink or two could be just what you will need to get the creative juices flowing.

One University of Illinois study polled 40 guys on their Study habits and discovered a guy was more inventive when he had a blood alcohol content of about .075.

As for real memory capability, participants’ memories were marginally better when they had not had anything to drink.

What you can take away from this: If you have a creative writing task to complete, sinking a few before seeing your English tutor to brainstorm ideas could help! But just a small bit of it. Do not get really drunk whilst studying, text somebody you shouldn’t, fail your test and blame it on us.

2. Alcohol can make you smarter.

As if giving you a spark of inspiration wasn’t sufficient, moderate alcohol consumption may also keep your mind sharp as time passes.

Another study conducted on alcohol in 2011 discovered ethanol helps the nerves in your brain “[protect] against the development of dementia in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases.”

Remember, though, it’s about moderation. Binge drinking is not great for your brain at all, in any shape or form.

3. Alcohol may even help you overcome that annoying cold.

Ever noticed you seem to get sick in the most inconvenient times ever? Like when you’ve got an exam right around the corner? Well, whiskey works wonders, especially for those who have a sore throat.

Whether your spent too much time yelling at that super loud Frat party last weekend or you feel a cold coming on, try adding a spoonful of whiskey into a cup of warm water and gargling with it to numb your throat a little. If you would like more of a soothing quality, add a teaspoon of honey into the mix.

Want something on the cooler side that is also packed with Vitamin C? Consider mixing up a whiskey cherry smoothie.

What are you waiting for? Grab your best Yarra Valley wine, finest Irish whiskey or best German beer and begin studying! A few drinks could be the difference between you be an A grade student compared to a B grade student!

Chris Bosh’s Eagerness to Play Leaves Heat at an Ethical Crossroads

Chris Bosh, one of the leading players in the N.B.A., has never ever caused trouble for his group, on or off the court. He has actually won 2 N.B.A. titles and been selected for the All-Star game an astounding 11 times. The Miami Heat, nevertheless, do not desire him to step on the court for them this season, or maybe ever again, asking him to hang up his basketball jerseys for good.

In one of the strangest and complicated standoffs in sports history, Bosh and the Heat are locked in a disagreement over whether he ought to be deemed medically fit to play after dealing with serious illness. With training camp scheduled to begin today, Bosh states he is ready to go, the Heat says he is not.

Bosh’s last 2 seasons have been derailed by blood clots. Bosh has suggested that he has worked with a personal physician to develop treatments that would permit him to play.

Bosh is owed about $76 million over the next 3 seasons regardless of whether he plays or not. So if the team is, in fact, keeping an eye out for Bosh’s welfare, it suggests an exception to what is possibly a more typical practice of pro sports franchises: pushing sports stars to play despite medical concerns.

The Heat announced their conclusion, mentioning a medical examination, after Bosh’s recent emergence from a self-imposed cocoon of silence to wage a public battle with the team’s medical personnel. Bosh has actually done numerous interviews with Undisturbed– his former colleague LeBron James’s digital platform for professional athletes– in which he has looked to make his case.

People with blood clots usually take blood-thinning medication, which is most likely one of the most daunting obstacles for Bosh. Athletes who are on blood slimmers are advised to avoid contact sports because of an increased possibility of internal bleeding and other problems. Even an elbow to the ribs might cause significant damage, stated Dr. David Forsh, the chief of orthopaedic trauma at the Icahn School of Medication at Mount Sinai in Manhattan.

Bosh experienced his very first known clotting issue in February 2015. He had cramps, convulsions and shortness of breath, although he attempted to conceal his symptoms, he stated. Bosh remembered one specific circumstance when he was in pain up until 3 or 4 in the early morning and the Heat were scheduled to deal with the Dallas Mavericks the next day. Bosh played because the Heat was already short-handed.

Bosh talked about the life of an athlete in his podcast, referring to the ‘one thing about athletes’ being that they neglect discomfort, or attempt to disregard pain, which he thinks is one of the worst things athletes can do.

Bosh was ultimately hospitalized, and tests exposed that an embolism in his calf had moved to his lungs, triggering a lung embolism– an issue that can be deadly. Bosh had surgery and invested nine days in a medical facility. He lost 20 to 25 pounds, he said, and missed out on the last 30 games of the 2014-15 seasons, giving his custom basketball uniforms a long rest.

Bosh has actually never openly articulated his specific course of treatment; however he most likely took blood-thinning drugs. He appeared in a TV commercial for one such medication, Xarelto.

Bosh was cleared by the Heat to return for the 2015-16 season openers. He played well through the first half of the season, averaging 19.1 points and 7.4 rebounds per game prior to the All-Star break. But a couple of days prior to the All-Star basketball game, he woke up with a sore calf. He was quickly found to have had a recurrence of blood clots. He met several medical professionals, who informed him that his season was over and that his career was most likely ended as well, he thought.

Bosh also alluded to the stress between himself and the Heat’s medical personnel.

 

It has mostly remained a one-sided public tussle. The Heat, aside from erratic declarations, have not spoken in detail about Bosh’s medical circumstance, nor have team authorities said exactly what liability, if any, the franchise may have if something were to happen to Bosh on the court.

 

The Heat declined to comment when asked for this article. The players’ union have not returned a call looking for comment as of yet.

Samantha Brennan, a viewpoint teacher at Western University in London, Ontario, teaches a class on sports ethics that discuss the function of group physicians and the conflicts of interest that can arise– namely, clearing athletes to go back to the court, track or field before they are ready.

So what happens if an athlete, fully aware of the medical risks, demands to continue to play? Does the team have a moral duty to watch out for the athlete’s wellness? For the most parts, Brennan stated, threat taking is delegated, it is typically up to the discretion of the player. The challenge with lots of professional athletes, she said, is that they have actually invested a lot of themselves in their careers from an early age that it can cloud their judgment.

Eventually, Brennan mentioned that a professional athlete is an employee, and group authorities have the power to do what they want.

Dr. Jack Ansell, a teacher of medication at Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine on Long Island, stated that he knew of a number of professional athletes who had handled blood-clot problems by taking blood thinners in between games.

Ansell, a member and former chairman of the medical and clinical advisory board of the National Embolism Alliance, has actually not examined Bosh and has no specific knowledge of his case. However Ansell said he believed that Bosh would need long-lasting blood-thinning treatment to prevent repeating embolisms. The difficult schedule of the N.B.A. would make intermittent treatment a challenge.

Rebekah Bradford Plath, a speed skater who completed at the 2010 Winter Olympics, developed a pulmonary embolism in 2012. While still on blood-thinning treatment, she resumed training. The risks were relatively minimal. Long-track speed skating is a non-contact sport, although falls do happen; Bradford Plath wore a helmet.

Last year, after having surgical treatment on her knee, Bradford Plath had a recurrence of blood clotting even though she was taking blood thinners at the time. After her doctor increased the dosage, she stated, the clot cleared.

Bradford Plath, who still takes blood thinners when she travels on planes, continues to train with an eye on the 2018 Winter season Olympics.

Plus Size Women Models Are Everywhere. But Where Are The Men?

clothes-2-1551378-1280x960When you think about the word ‘plus size’ or ‘plus size clothes’, what gender automatically comes into your mind? Is it a male or female? I am going to guess that the majority of you had a picture of a plus sized woman in your mind, am I correct? Well, in fact you are not alone, a large proportion of the population thought the same as you and many wonder if that means they need to order more womens shoes. It seems that men are being forgotten when it comes to ‘plus size’ advertising, and you may be wondering if they are just living it up in some lavish Lorne accommodation. You may see the occasional plus size guy in a movie, but when do you actually see the larger guy shown in admirable television advertisements and seen as fashionable? And why isn’t the term ‘plus size’ used for these guys? A study was undertaken to seek the answer.

 

So when is a male classified as ‘plus-size’?

This a very puzzling question. To be honest, there is no real clear-cut answer to this question. No real distinction between men and women. Many suggest that the answer is that a male is considered as plus sized when his weight exceeds the average weight of the male population.

According to the CDCP (Center for Disease Control and Prevention), the average waist measurements of American males is currently 39.7 inches, which equates to a pant size ranging between 38 and 40. By using this information, an informed conclusion could be that a male can be classified as ‘plus size’ when his waist size exceeds the average of 38 to 40 inches. In saying this, men are actually portrayed as being ‘larger’ when they are actually quite close to the average size of the countries male population.

 

Why the lack of ‘big bro’s’ modelling?

Contrary to what many believe, there are larger men in the fashion industry who are considered to be ‘plus-size’. They are just in very small numbers.

Why you ask. This has everything to do with the very limited ranges available to larger models to dress plus size including having to buy more womens high heels. If you compare the extensive range of plus size women’s clothing compared to male large size clothing, there is a very large differential. There are many plus size woman models who are releasing their own clothing lines, for lingerie, sleepwear and everyday clothing as compared to the very limited variety offered to larger men. Not to mention, men’s plus size clothes only get advertised when there are new clothing lines, which is a downside to the men’s large size clothing industry.

 

To read more about this interesting topic, please feel free to click on the link below to the original article.

http://mic.com/articles/134032/female-plus-size-models-are-on-the-rise-so-where-are-all-the-plus-size-men#.vt01RxQrf